Green Going On?

Can we believe it? The Green Revolution is back again in Iran?

Facebook and Twitter and all these instruments of message-spreading, the whole internet is full of “25 Bahman” and “13 Februar” . The song which had been sorrounded with mystery and fascinating magic and which was sung by countless Iranians in Europe and locally in Iran, Yare Dabestani-e-man (which I finally know means “My schoolmate” and has turned into a national anthem for freedom) is back again on screen and in my ears.

Welcome back, Iran’s Green Revolution, and we will pay thanks to Tunisia and Egypt  if this time the Sea of Green which started in 2009 and was crushed down so bloodily, will spread again over their country and its waves will finally drown the bastions of inhumanity there. Welcome back, “my schoolmates” whose songs were ringing in my ears after school had been over in the afternoon and I was heading towards the central square to join some protest rally organized in our town.

What do these guys, the students and the believers in freedom, have to counter the attacks of their cruel leaders they do not want? It’s their minds, their technology, their youth, I assume. It’s their sweet humanity they show and spite into the faces of the fanatics who beat them up and detain them about a hundred at each rally. And it’s the time. Every revolution has its preparation time and its tunring point. Time, patience and determination which they hopefully are equipped with will do its best. Hey, it’s 2011 and they still care for their country!

Courage must have its reward. I hope not I won’t need to forget the first and only Persian words I got to know back in summer 2009 – “ittihad” and “azadeh”.

And know what – I’m Jewish, Israeli and I’m behind you. This should not be a surprise for anyone.

Isralike

SirrK: A most Unique feature of Our Iran Revolution is Courage-Dignity+Class of Our Relentless Revolutionaries #iranelection #sog #neda @SirrK RT

(twitter.com)

 

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Giving Names

b”h

What I’ve observed lately is, that many people surprisingly carry very similiar names. Not that I haven’t known this before, it’s just that now I pay more attention to the importance of names. And what do I see?

People are being randomly named. The criteria for namig one’s babies are often quite trivial. Very often the most persuading reason for a mum or a dad to name their childern XYZ is cause they themselves like the name.

Now, it’s not that one should feel uncomfortable with his child’s name, never!

The question is whether this should be the only criteria.

Haven’t this occured to you at least once in your life that a person’s name seemed unfitting or even senseless to you? Lately, my friend who’d been named the same as hundreds of thousands of other girls in the same city and having as at least 5 of her friends being called the same, told me that this name (Anya) is not a name but rather a collective term.

Which is a remarkable statement – remarkably sad.

I feel there is an inflation of  names taking place, hand in hand with an inflation of meaning. Names, for example in Judaism, are supposed to be reflections of a person’s being, “summarising” the personality of someone in a word. Hebrew, the Jewish language, is a very compressed and accurate language. If you name a person in Hebrew, it doesn’t go after how lovely or strong the syllables sound. The name says its meaning out loud without compromise. And since its meaning is compressed in it, you can have various persons with the same name and still they would all be individual.

In an “inflation of names”, the individuality and importance of the person carrying the name becomes absolete. A carelessly given name implifies the carelessness for a person’s being. 

It happens when parents, giving names to their children, rather focus on their own taste, therefore “directing” their intentions towards themselves and not towards the child and its future being.

No doubt, this also happens with Hebrew names in our time when a certain name trend overthrows traditional ways of name-giving. Shortcuts,  senseless variations and unisex names all diminish the meaningfulness of a name. Yet still, in the most cases, Hebrew names more than others have retained their original meanings while names in other languages and cultures have often lost  or forgotten theirs by now.

Isralike

Ooh, ooh ooh ooh!

b”h

Dear all, hi!

In a few lines a smaller than small nutshell I’d like to sum up my Am Echad Machane (“Camp”) experience until tonight:

– AMERICAN.

– One of the best and most integrative leaders of the camp ever. Our co-rosh.

– Girl in my group has never heard of  the Holo.caust (remember, it’s a Jewish camp!)!! Shock!!!

– Breakdancing girls and mama-playing toddlers

– Daylong raiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.i.i.i.i.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.i.i.i………….ii.i.i.i.IIIIIIIIIIn!

– Big babies and little grandmums and granddads

– Chilling security guards with (almost) no Hebrew accent – DELIGHT!

Well, I’m neither American nor charedi no Am-Echadish nor loving rain and cold nor can I breakdance….but

…it’s kinda nice…:

Give me freeeeedom, give me fiiiiii-re, give me REASON, take me higha….

[…]

Singing forever young, singing songs underneath the sun

Lets rejoice in the beautifull game.

And togheter at the end of the day –

WE ALL SAY

When I get older I will be stronger

They’ll call me freedom

Just like a wavin’ flag

And then it goes back
And then it goes back
And then it goes back!!

!!

Isralike.

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